Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending


Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending

 
Delaware state governmental policies have been an unfortunate catalyst for the decline of Delaware’s economy for far too long. For instance…
 
  • Over the past 10 years, both the Delaware per capita income and average wage have gone from above the national average to below.
 
  • According to the Delaware Department of Labor, employment is projected to grow at only 0.6%. 
 
  • Since 2009, Delaware has had five recessions compared to one in the nation.
 
  • By opposing choice in public education, the State government reinforces a system where two-thirds of Delaware students are not proficient in reading and math.  In addition to the ramifications for Delaware’s students and their future employability, as has been widely reported, one of the other most evident outcomes is the number of professionals with school-age children who work in Delaware but choose to reside out of state.
 
  • Misguided environmental policies have driven industrial electric rates well above neighboring states’ rates, creating the documented exodus of manufacturing jobs to other states and an impediment to developing new, well-paying manufacturing jobs. 
 
Utilizing publicly available data, voluminous research from respected academic institutions, and federal and state resources, CRI is the only non-profit entity in Delaware that is objectively identifying the regressive outcomes of certain state policies and disseminating those damaging ramifications to not only county and state legislators but also the public.
 
In partnership with other like-minded organizations, the primary goals of this Center are to develop strategies and alternative policy options that will bring transparency - and changes - to the State’s $9 billion budget process while objectively advocating for regulatory reform.
 
Center Co-Director Dr. John Stapleford has over 40 years of experience in applied regional economics.  He established the University of Delaware’s Bureau of Economic Research and the Delaware Small Business Development Center.  Dr. Stapleford has served as a senior economist and associate director for Moody’s Analytics and has executed contracts with most federal and Delaware state agencies.
 
Co-Director Charlie Copeland has an MBA from Duke University with a focus in Finance and spent over 25 years growing a marketing services business that achieved several global awards for operational excellence.  He also spent six years in the Delaware State Senate, serving his last two years as the Senate Minority Leader.  Charlie, who focused much of his Senate career on education reform and government accountability, remains a sought-after speaker on issues related to governmental accountability.
 

What will be the impact of the Covid-19 virus on Delaware's economy?   There are two extreme views among economists regarding the U.S. economy. The first view anticipates a substantial recession similar to 2008-09. The second expects a severe dip in the second quarter of 2020 with a...

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According to the Wall Street Journal, Republican Ron DeSantis owes his gubernatorial victory in Florida to the support of about 100,000 African American women who were advocates for school choice. Of the roughly 650,000 black women who voted in the Florida election, 18% chose Mr. DeSantis. Could thi...

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If the objective of Delaware’s economic development efforts is jobs, the available data may provide a logic for allocating development resources.   Over any particular year, the net change in employment comes from business start-up and expansion minus business closures and contrac...

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Delaware is one of just five states that levies a gross receipts tax (GRT). A GRT is an excise tax on the gross revenues of a company regardless of whether that company has profits or losses.   Public finance economists view the GRT as inefficient and unsound. It double or triple taxes bu...

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According to the leading index calculated by the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank, Delaware can expect a contraction in the state’s economy in the second quarter of 2020. Is there any reason for concern?   Each month the Phila Fed estimates leading indexes for all the states and th...

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It took New Castle County (NCC) until 2015 for employment to return to the high water mark hit in 2007. Since 2015 the NCC employment has only inched forward at 0.6% per annum. And the Delaware Department of Labor projects this modest growth rate to continue through 2026.   To his credit ...

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State Senator Darius Brown has proposed additional minimum wage increases on top of the increase from the last legislative session. These proposed increases are substantial, raising the Delaware minimum wage from $9.25 to $11.00 in 2020 and then adding $1.00 every year after until a $15.00 minimum w...

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Productivity is typically measured as the amount of output (the market value) of the goods or services each worker in an industry produces over a year.   Based upon output per worker or productivity, one can identify which industries will pay high wages and maintain competitive prices. Ob...

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In its recent report on “Growth Centers” the Brooking Institute declares that “the future of America’s economy lies in its high-tech innovation sector.”   Brookings identifies a cohort of 13 innovation industries where R&D expenditures exceed $20,000 per ...

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The Pew Center Trust has recently updated its information website on the fiscal health of states. It confirms much of what is known about the State of Delaware’s finances.   On the positive side, as of 2018 Delaware state government could run 20.5 days on rainy day funds if tax reve...

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