Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending


Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending

 
Delaware state governmental policies have been an unfortunate catalyst for the decline of Delaware’s economy for far too long. For instance…
 
  • Over the past 10 years, both the Delaware per capita income and average wage have gone from above the national average to below.
 
  • According to the Delaware Department of Labor, employment is projected to grow at only 0.6%. 
 
  • Since 2009, Delaware has had five recessions compared to one in the nation.
 
  • By opposing choice in public education, the State government reinforces a system where two-thirds of Delaware students are not proficient in reading and math.  In addition to the ramifications for Delaware’s students and their future employability, as has been widely reported, one of the other most evident outcomes is the number of professionals with school-age children who work in Delaware but choose to reside out of state.
 
  • Misguided environmental policies have driven industrial electric rates well above neighboring states’ rates, creating the documented exodus of manufacturing jobs to other states and an impediment to developing new, well-paying manufacturing jobs. 
 
Utilizing publicly available data, voluminous research from respected academic institutions, and federal and state resources, CRI is the only non-profit entity in Delaware that is objectively identifying the regressive outcomes of certain state policies and disseminating those damaging ramifications to not only county and state legislators but also the public.
 
In partnership with other like-minded organizations, the primary goals of this Center are to develop strategies and alternative policy options that will bring transparency - and changes - to the State’s $9 billion budget process while objectively advocating for regulatory reform.
 
Co-Director Charlie Copeland has an MBA from Duke University with a focus in Finance and spent over 25 years growing a marketing services business that achieved several global awards for operational excellence.  He also spent six years in the Delaware State Senate, serving his last two years as the Senate Minority Leader.  Charlie, who focused much of his Senate career on education reform and government accountability, remains a sought-after speaker on issues related to governmental accountability.
 

The latest data on state to state migration confirms that folks vote rationally with their feet and that Delaware legislators are in denial about this fact.   Census data shows that two-thirds of the net migrants into Delaware from 2007-09 came from just four states: New Jersey, New York, Pen...

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The most recent benchmarked data does little to evidence that state and local government is recognizing the true impact of the recent recession. As shown in the chart below, as private sector employment in the nation and the Delaware region dropped from 2007 through 2009, state and local government ...

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In CNBC’s recent ranking of the top states for business Delaware came in 42nd. Is there really any reason for concern? If so, what needs to be done to make Delaware more business competitive?   CNBC scores the 50 states on 40 different measures of competitiveness grouped into ten aggreg...

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The passage of New Castle County’s 1998 Uniform Development Code (UDC) swiftly halted—and continues to harm-- economic growth and development. Within just a few years employment in the County had flat-lined, more people were moving out of NCC than were moving in, residential permits shru...

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The passage of the Uniform Development Code in 1998 has brought New Castle Countys economy to a standstill.
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Delaware is ranked number one in economic freedom among the states in the 6th edition of the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of North America. Why is this important?
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The Caesar Rodney Institute’s analysis of the Universal Recycling bill, SB234 indicates tonnage diverted for the added recycled material will have a potential value of $0.8 million/yr.  Costs to Delaware residents will be $28.6 million/yr. So, each $1 of benefit will cost Delawa...

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The future of Delawares economy lies primarily with its current business base.
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State expenditures on Medicaid are the fastest growing component of the General Fund.
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Less than half of Delawareans receive unemployment insurance benefits when they lose their job. The claims process is time consuming and demeaning for many. Errors in payment and outright fraud waste millions. There is a better way. Personal Unemployment Accounts (UA), run like a...

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