Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending


Center for Analysis of Delaware's Economy & Government Spending

 
Delaware state governmental policies have been an unfortunate catalyst for the decline of Delaware’s economy for far too long. For instance…
 
  • Over the past 10 years, both the Delaware per capita income and average wage have gone from above the national average to below.
 
  • According to the Delaware Department of Labor, employment is projected to grow at only 0.6%. 
 
  • Since 2009, Delaware has had five recessions compared to one in the nation.
 
  • By opposing choice in public education, the State government reinforces a system where two-thirds of Delaware students are not proficient in reading and math.  In addition to the ramifications for Delaware’s students and their future employability, as has been widely reported, one of the other most evident outcomes is the number of professionals with school-age children who work in Delaware but choose to reside out of state.
 
  • Misguided environmental policies have driven industrial electric rates well above neighboring states’ rates, creating the documented exodus of manufacturing jobs to other states and an impediment to developing new, well-paying manufacturing jobs. 
 
Utilizing publicly available data, voluminous research from respected academic institutions, and federal and state resources, CRI is the only non-profit entity in Delaware that is objectively identifying the regressive outcomes of certain state policies and disseminating those damaging ramifications to not only county and state legislators but also the public.
 
In partnership with other like-minded organizations, the primary goals of this Center are to develop strategies and alternative policy options that will bring transparency - and changes - to the State’s $9 billion budget process while objectively advocating for regulatory reform.
 
Center Co-Director Dr. John Stapleford has over 40 years of experience in applied regional economics.  He established the University of Delaware’s Bureau of Economic Research and the Delaware Small Business Development Center.  Dr. Stapleford has served as a senior economist and associate director for Moody’s Analytics and has executed contracts with most federal and Delaware state agencies.
 
Co-Director Charlie Copeland has an MBA from Duke University with a focus in Finance and spent over 25 years growing a marketing services business that achieved several global awards for operational excellence.  He also spent six years in the Delaware State Senate, serving his last two years as the Senate Minority Leader.  Charlie, who focused much of his Senate career on education reform and government accountability, remains a sought-after speaker on issues related to governmental accountability.
 

In March of this year, Caesar Rodney Institute’s Center for Economic Policy and Analysis released a technical study of the methodology behind Delaware’s prevailing wage system. With regard to the prevailing wage (PW) the study documented that: a) the methodology used by the Department of...

Read More
PDF Doc

The April, 2012 labor market data for Delaware has just been released and the numbers are not encouraging. Compared to April of 2008, four years ago, total employment in Delaware is down by 20,000. Construction jobs are down 40%, manufacturing off 22%, and finance jobs down 6%. Government, of course...

Read More
PDF Doc

The mantra of President Obama is to raise taxes on the rich rather than cut the size of government. In Delaware, the governor, supported by the legislature, has already done this. Effective January 1, 2010 the top marginal tax rate applied to personal income of $60,000 or more was raised from almost...

Read More
PDF Doc

Since Delaware has had 15 consecutive years of conservative governors followed by 18 years of progressive governors, it is an interesting case study. Do the differences in the governance philosophies have consequences for Delaware’s economy? A simple answer to this question is to consider the ...

Read More
PDF Doc

 In a May 2012 report the Institute for Justice ranked all the states with regards to barriers to entry to low- and moderate-income occupations. Delaware had the 42nd most burdensome licensing laws and was the 25th most extensively and onerously licensed state.   The report documents the l...

Read More
PDF Doc

Across a variety of measures, Delawares labor market is hurting. First, the states official unemployment rate is 7.2%, double the historic average of 3.5%. This means 32,000 persons have actively looked for a job in the past four weeks without success. Five years ago this group totaled 15,000 Delawa...

Read More
PDF Doc

No other organization in Delaware does what we do at the Caesar Rodney Institute: provide in-depth, non-partisan analyses of public policy issues and advocate in Dover for better policies_OLD related to economics, the state budget, energy issues and education policy. Every day CRI makes a difference...

Read More

When a state taxes something there will be less of it and when it rewards something there will be more of it. Delaware’s tax structure heavily taxes those who are most likely to create sustainable economic growth and new jobs, but rewards businesses like Fisker Automotive who receive generous ...

Read More

What do the numbers on Delaware’s production tell us about the effectiveness of the state’s economic policies_OLD?       Delaware’s economic growth rate, as measured by growth in gross state product (GSP) in chained 2009 dollars, has lagged behind the natio...

Read More

Many state legislators in Delaware have chosen to be joined at the hip with the Delaware public teacher’s union. This is partly because of the generous campaign contributions bestowed each year by the union to political candidates that see the world the way the union does.   Chang...

Read More
PDF Doc